Tag: Tutorial

How to Accelerate Migrations to AWS with CloudEndure – AWS Online Tech Talks

How to Accelerate Migrations to AWS with CloudEndure – AWS Online Tech Talks

How to Accelerate Migrations to AWS with CloudEndure – AWS Online Tech Talks
The complexity of enterprise IT environments with diverse infrastructure and OS types, monolithic legacy applications, mission critical databases, compatibility issues, and continuously changing workloads can make cloud migrations challenging. And don’t forget your business’ demands for the project – limited downtime, no performance disruption, and tight timelines with limited budget. In this tech talk, we’ll show you how our recent acquisition of CloudEndure can help you simplify, expedite, and automate large-scale migrations to AWS.

Learning Objectives:
– Identify common migration challenges and how you can overcome them
– Understand how to reduce time, risk, and specialized skill sets needed for complex migration projects
– See how you can minimize performance disruption during replication and shorten cutover windows to minutes

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Improving and securing your game-binaries distribution at scale

Improving and securing your game-binaries distribution at scale

This post is contributed by Yahav Biran | Sr. Solutions Architect, AWS and Scott Selinger | Associate Solutions Architect, AWS 

One of the challenges that game publishers face when employing CI/CD processes is the distribution of updated game binaries in a scalable, secure, and cost-effective way. Continuous integration and continuous deployment (CI/CD) processes enable game publishers to improve games throughout their lifecycle.

Often, CI/CD jobs contain minor changes that cause the CI/CD processes to push a full set of game binaries over the internet. This is a suboptimal approach. It negatively affects the cost of development network resources, customer network resources (output and input bandwidth), and the time it takes for a game update to propagate.

This post proposes a method of optimizing the game integration and deployments. Specifically, this method improves the distribution of updated game binaries to various targets, such as game-server farms. The proposed mechanism also adds to the security model designed to include progressive layers, starting from the Amazon EC2 instance that runs the game server. It also improves security of the game binaries, the game assets, and the monitoring of the game server deployments across several AWS Regions.

Why CI/CD in gaming is hard today

Game server binaries are usually a native application that includes binaries like graphic, sound, network, and physics assets, as well as scripts and media files. Game servers are usually developed with game engines like Unreal, Amazon Lumberyard, and Unity. Game binaries typically take up tens of gigabytes. However, because game developer teams modify only a few tens of kilobytes every day, frequent distribution of a full set of binaries is wasteful.

For a standard global game deployment, distributing game binaries requires compressing the entire binaries set and transferring the compressed version to destinations, then decompressing it upon arrival. You can optimize the process by decoupling the various layers, pushing and deploying them individually.

In both cases, the continuous deployment process might be slow due to the compression and transfer durations. Also, distributing the image binaries incurs unnecessary data transfer costs, since data is duplicated. Other game-binary distribution methods may require the game publisher’s DevOps teams to install and maintain custom caching mechanisms.

This post demonstrates an optimal method for distributing game server updates. The solution uses containerized images stored in Amazon ECR and deployed using Amazon ECS or Amazon EKS to shorten the distribution duration and reduce network usage.

How can containers help?

Dockerized game binaries enable standard caching with no implementation from the game publisher. Dockerized game binaries allow game publishers to stage their continuous build process in two ways:

  • To rebuild only the layer that was updated in a particular build process and uses the other cached layers.
  • To reassemble both packages into a deployable game server.

The use of ECR with either ECS or EKS takes care of the last mile deployment to the Docker container host.

Larger application binaries mean longer application loading times. To reduce the overall application initialization time, I decouple the deployment of the binaries and media files to allow the application to update faster. For example, updates in the application media files do not require the replication of the engine binaries or media files. This is achievable if the application binaries can be deployed in a separate directory structure. For example:

/opt/local/engine

/opt/local/engine-media

/opt/local/app

/opt/local/app-media

Containerized game servers deployment on EKS

The application server can be deployed as a single Kubernetes pod with multiple containers. The engine media (/opt/local/engine-media), the application (/opt/local/app), and the application media (/opt/local/app-media) spawn as Kubernetes initContainers and the engine binary (/opt/local/engine) runs as the main container.

apiVersion: v1
kind: Pod
metadata:
  name: my-game-app-pod
  labels:
    app: my-game-app
volumes:
      - name: engine-media-volume
          emptyDir: {}
      - name: app-volume
          emptyDir: {}
      - name: app-media-volume
          emptyDir: {}
      initContainers:
        - name: app
          image: the-app- image
          imagePullPolicy: Always
          command:
            - "sh"
            - "-c"
            - "cp /* /opt/local/engine-media"
          volumeMounts:
            - name: engine-media-volume
              mountPath: /opt/local/engine-media
        - name: engine-media
          image: the-engine-media-image
          imagePullPolicy: Always
          command:
            - "sh"
            - "-c"
            - "cp /* /opt/local/app"
          volumeMounts:
            - name: app-volume
              mountPath: /opt/local/app
        - name: app-media
          image: the-app-media-image
          imagePullPolicy: Always
          command:
            - "sh"
            - "-c"
            - "cp /* /opt/local/app-media"
          volumeMounts:
            - name: app-media-volume
              mountPath: /opt/local/app-media
spec:
  containers:
  - name: the-engine
    image: the-engine-image
    imagePullPolicy: Always
    volumeMounts:
       - name: engine-media-volume
         mountPath: /opt/local/engine-media
       - name: app-volume
         mountPath: /opt/local/app
       - name: app-media-volume
         mountPath: /opt/local/app-media
    command: ['sh', '-c', '/opt/local/engine/start.sh']

Applying multi-stage game binaries builds

In this post, I use Docker multi-stage builds for containerizing the game asset builds. I use AWS CodeBuild to manage the build and to deploy the updates of game engines like Amazon Lumberyard as ready-to-play dedicated game servers.

Using this method, frequent changes in the game binaries require less than 1% of the data transfer typically required by full image replication to the nodes that run the game-server instances. This results in significant improvements in build and integration time.

I provide a deployment example for Amazon Lumberyard Multiplayer Sample that is deployed to an EKS cluster, but this can also be done using different container orchestration technology and different game engines. I also show that the image being deployed as a game-server instance is always the latest image, which allows centralized control of the code to be scheduled upon distribution.

This example shows an update of only 50 MB of game assets, whereas the full game-server binary is 3.1 GB. With only 1.5% of the content being updated, that speeds up the build process by 90% compared to non-containerized game binaries.

For security with EKS, apply the imagePullPolicy: Always option as part of the Kubernetes best practice container images deployment option. This option ensures that the latest image is pulled every time that the pod is started, thus deploying images from a single source in ECR, in this case.

Example setup

  • Read through the following sample, a multiplayer game sample, and see how to build and structure multiplayer games to employ the various features of the GridMate networking library.
  • Create an AWS CodeCommit or GitHub repository (multiplayersample-lmbr) that includes the game engine binaries, the game assets (.pak, .cfg and more), AWS CodeBuild specs, and EKS deployment specs.
  • Create a CodeBuild project that points to the CodeCommit repo. The build image uses aws/codebuild/docker:18.09.0: the built-in image maintained by CodeBuild configured with 3 GB of memory and two vCPUs. The compute allocated for build capacity can be modified for cost and build time tradeoff.
  • Create an EKS cluster designated as a staging or an integration environment for the game title. In this case, it’s multiplayersample.

The binaries build Git repository

The Git repository is composed of five core components ordered by their size:

  • The game engine binaries (for example, BinLinux64.Dedicated.tar.gz). This is the compressed version of the game engine artifacts that are not updated regularly, hence they are deployed as a compressed file. The maintenance of this file is usually done by a different team than the developers working on the game title.
  • The game binaries (for example, MultiplayerSample_pc_Paks_Dedicated). This directory is maintained by the game development team and managed as a standard multi-branch repository. The artifacts under this directory get updated on a daily or weekly basis, depending on the game development plan.
  • The build-related specifications (for example, buildspec.yml  and Dockerfile). These files specify the build process. For simplicity, I only included the Docker build process to convey the speed of continuous integration. The process can be easily extended to include the game compilation and linked process as well.
  • The Docker artifacts for containerizing the game engine and the game binaries (for example, start.sh and start.py). These scripts usually are maintained by the game DevOps teams and updated outside of the regular game development plan. More details about these scripts can be found in a sample that describes how to deploy a game-server in Amazon EKS.
  • The deployment specifications (for example, eks-spec) specify the Kubernetes game-server deployment specs. This is for reference only, since the CD process usually runs in a separate set of resources like staging EKS clusters, which are owned and maintained by a different team.

The game build process

The build process starts with any Git push event on the Git repository. The build process includes three core phases denoted by pre_build, buildand post_build in multiplayersample-lmbr/buildspec.yml

  1. The pre_build phase unzips the game-engine binaries and logs in to the container registry (Amazon ECR) to prepare.
  2. The buildphase executes the docker build command that includes the multi-stage build.
    • The Dockerfile spec file describes the multi-stage image build process. It starts by adding the game-engine binaries to the Linux OS, ubuntu:18.04 in this example.
    • FROM ubuntu:18.04
    • ADD BinLinux64.Dedicated.tar /
    • It continues by adding the necessary packages to the game server (for example, ec2-metadata, boto3, libc, and Python) and the necessary scripts for controlling the game server runtime in EKS. These packages are only required for the CI/CD process. Therefore, they are only added in the CI/CD process. This enables a clean decoupling between the necessary packages for development, integration, and deployment, and simplifies the process for both teams.
    • RUN apt-get install -y python python-pip
    • RUN apt-get install -y net-tools vim
    • RUN apt-get install -y libc++-dev
    • RUN pip install mcstatus ec2-metadata boto3
    • ADD start.sh /start.sh
    • ADD start.py /start.py
    • The second part is to copy the game engine from the previous stage --from=0 to the next build stage. In this case, you copy the game engine binaries with the two COPY Docker directives.
    • COPY --from=0 /BinLinux64.Dedicated/* /BinLinux64.Dedicated/
    • COPY --from=0 /BinLinux64.Dedicated/qtlibs /BinLinux64.Dedicated/qtlibs/
    • Finally, the game binaries are added as a separate layer on top of the game-engine layers, which concludes the build. It’s expected that constant daily changes are made to this layer, which is why it is packaged separately. If your game includes other abstractions, you can break this step into several discrete Docker image layers.
    • ADD MultiplayerSample_pc_Paks_Dedicated /BinLinux64.Dedicated/
  3. The post_build phase pushes the game Docker image to the centralized container registry for further deployment to the various regional EKS clusters. In this phase, tag and push the new image to the designated container registry in ECR.

- docker tag $IMAGE_REPO_NAME:$IMAGE_TAG

$AWS_ACCOUNT_ID.dkr.ecr.$AWS_DEFAULT_REGION.amazonaws.com/$IMAGE_REPO_NAME:$IMAGE_TAG

docker push

$AWS_ACCOUNT_ID.dkr.ecr.$AWS_DEFAULT_REGION.amazonaws.com/$IMAGE_REPO_NAME:$IMAGE_TAG

The game deployment process in EKS

At this point, you’ve pushed the updated image to the designated container registry in ECR (/$IMAGE_REPO_NAME:$IMAGE_TAG). This image is scheduled as a game server in an EKS cluster as game-server Kubernetes deployment, as described in the sample.

In this example, I use  imagePullPolicy: Always.


containers:
…
        image: /$IMAGE_REPO_NAME:$IMAGE_TAG/multiplayersample-build
        imagePullPolicy: Always
        name: multiplayersample
…

By using imagePullPolicy, you ensure that no one can circumvent Amazon ECR security. You can securely make ECR the single source of truth with regards to scheduled binaries. However, ECR to the worker nodes via kubelet, the node agent. Given the size of a whole image combined with the frequency with which it is pulled, that would amount to a significant additional cost to your project.

However, Docker layers allow you to update only the layers that were modified, preventing a whole image update. Also, they enable secure image distribution. In this example, only the layer MultiplayerSample_pc_Paks_Dedicated is updated.

Proposed CI/CD process

The following diagram shows an example end-to-end architecture of a full-scale game-server deployment using EKS as the orchestration system, ECR as the container registry, and CodeBuild as the build engine.

Game developers merge changes to the Git repository that include both the preconfigured game-engine binaries and the game artifacts. Upon merge events, CodeBuild builds a multistage game-server image that is pushed to a centralized container registry hosted by ECR. At this point, DevOps teams in different Regions continuously schedule the image as a game server, pulling only the updated layer in the game server image. This keeps the entire game-server fleet running the same game binaries set, making for a secure deployment.

 

Try it out

I published two examples to guide you through the process of building an Amazon EKS cluster and deploying a containerized game server with large binaries.

Conclusion

Adopting CI/CD in game development improves the software development lifecycle by continuously deploying quality-based updated game binaries. CI/CD in game development is usually hindered by the cost of distributing large binaries, in particular, by cross-regional deployments.

Non-containerized paradigms require deployment of the full set of binaries, which is an expensive and time-consuming task. Containerized game-server binaries with AWS build tools and Amazon EKS-based regional clusters of game servers enable secure and cost-effective distribution of large binary sets to enable increased agility in today’s game development.

In this post, I demonstrated a reduction of more than 90% of the network traffic required by implementing an effective CI/CD system in a large-scale deployment of multiplayer game servers.

from AWS Compute Blog

Introduction to Amazon EC2 Instances Featuring AMD EPYC Processors – AWS Online Tech Talks

Introduction to Amazon EC2 Instances Featuring AMD EPYC Processors – AWS Online Tech Talks

Introduction to Amazon EC2 Instances Featuring AMD EPYC Processors – AWS Online Tech Talks
Customers are constantly looking to optimize performance and cost for running their workloads. Amazon EC2 Instances featuring AMD EPYC Processors are new services that enable customers to do just that. In this tech talk, you will learn about these EC2 instances and how they can be a good option to right-size your workloads. We will provide an overview of the service, go over use cases, benefits, customer successes, and how simple migration to these workloads can be.

Learning Objectives:
– Learn about Amazon EC2 instances featuring AMD EPYC Processors
– Learn how the new instances can be good for right-sizing your workload allowing you to optimize performance and cost
– Learn the uses cases and benefits of Amazon EC2 instances featuring AMD EPYC Processors

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Integrating AWS X-Ray with AWS App Mesh

Integrating AWS X-Ray with AWS App Mesh

This post is contributed by Lulu Zhao | Software Development Engineer II, AWS

 

AWS X-Ray helps developers and DevOps engineers quickly understand how an application and its underlying services are performing. When it’s integrated with AWS App Mesh, the combination makes for a powerful analytical tool.

X-Ray helps to identify and troubleshoot the root causes of errors and performance issues. It’s capable of analyzing and debugging distributed applications, including those based on a microservices architecture. It offers insights into the impact and reach of errors and performance problems.

In this post, I demonstrate how to integrate it with App Mesh.

Overview

App Mesh is a service mesh based on the Envoy proxy that makes it easy to monitor and control microservices. App Mesh standardizes how your microservices communicate, giving you end-to-end visibility and helping to ensure high application availability.

With App Mesh, it’s easy to maintain consistent visibility and network traffic control for services built across multiple types of compute infrastructure. App Mesh configures each service to export monitoring data and implements consistent communications control logic across your application.

A service mesh is like a communication layer for microservices. All communication between services happens through the mesh. Customers use App Mesh to configure a service mesh that contains virtual services, virtual nodes, virtual routes, and corresponding routes.

However, it’s challenging to visualize the way that request traffic flows through the service mesh while attempting to identify latency and other types of performance issues. This is particularly true as the number of microservices increases.

It’s in exactly this area where X-Ray excels. To show a detailed workflow inside a service mesh, I implemented a tracing extension called X-Ray tracer inside Envoy. With it, I ensure that I’m tracing all inbound and outbound calls that are routed through Envoy.

Traffic routing with color app

The following example shows how X-Ray works with App Mesh. I used the Color App, a simple demo application, to showcase traffic routing.

This app has two Go applications that are included in the AWS X-Ray Go SDK: color-gateway and color-teller. The color-gateway application is exposed to external clients and responds to http://service-name:port/color, which retrieves color from color-teller. I deployed color-app using Amazon ECS. This image illustrates how color-gateway routes traffic into a virtual router and then into separate nodes using color-teller.

 

The following image shows client interactions with App Mesh in an X-Ray service map after requests have been made to the color-gateway and to color-teller.

Integration

There are two types of service nodes:

  • AWS::AppMesh::Proxy is generated by the X-Ray tracing extension inside Envoy.
  • AWS::ECS::Container is generated by the AWS X-Ray Go SDK.

The service graph arrows show the request workflow, which you may find helpful as you try to understand the relationships between services.

To send Envoy-generated segments into X-Ray, install the X-Ray daemon. The following code example shows the ECS task definition used to install the daemon into the container.

{
    "name": "xray-daemon",

    "image": "amazon/aws-xray-daemon",

    "user": "1337",

    "essential": true,

    "cpu": 32,

    "memoryReservation": 256,

    "portMappings": [

        {

            "hostPort": 2000,

            "containerPort": 2000,

            "protocol": "udp"

         }

After the Color app successfully launched, I made a request to color-gateway to fetch a color.

  • First, the Envoy proxy appmesh/colorgateway-vn in front of default-gateway received the request and routed it to the server default-gateway.
  • Then, default-gateway made a request to server default-colorteller-white to retrieve the color.
  • Instead of directly calling the color-teller server, the request went to the default-gateway Envoy proxy and the proxy routed the call to color-teller.

That’s the advantage of using the Envoy proxy. Envoy is a self-contained process that is designed to run in parallel with all application servers. All of the Envoy proxies form a transparent communication mesh through which each application sends and receives messages to and from localhost while remaining unaware of the broader network topology.

For App Mesh integration, the X-Ray tracer records the mesh name and virtual node name values and injects them into the segment JSON document. Here is an example:

“aws”: {
	“app_mesh”: {
		“mesh_name”: “appmesh”,
		“virtual_node_name”: “colorgateway-vn”
	}
},

To enable X-Ray tracing through App Mesh inside Envoy, you must set two environment variable configurations:

  • ENABLE_ENVOY_XRAY_TRACING
  • XRAY_DAEMON_PORT

The first one enables X-Ray tracing using 127.0.0.1:2000 as the default daemon endpoint to which generated segments are sent. If the daemon you installed listens on a different port, you can specify a port value to override the default X-Ray daemon port by using the second configuration.

Conclusion

Currently, AWS X-Ray supports SDKs written in multiple languages (including Java, Python, Go, .NET, and .NET Core, Node.js, and Ruby) to help you implement your services. For more information, see Getting Started with AWS X-Ray.

from AWS Compute Blog

Office Hours: Amazon Managed Blockchain – Building Distributed Applications w/ Hyperledger Fabric

Office Hours: Amazon Managed Blockchain – Building Distributed Applications w/ Hyperledger Fabric

Office Hours: Amazon Managed Blockchain – Building Distributed Applications w/ Hyperledger Fabric
Amazon Managed Blockchain is a fully managed service that makes it easy to create and manage scalable blockchain networks using the popular open source framework Hyperledger Fabric. Join us for AWS Office Hours, where you have the opportunity to ask AWS experts about anything on Amazon Managed Blockchain – from how a blockchain is different than databases, use cases for Hyperledger Fabric framework, to any specific questions regarding our features or functionality.

Learning Objectives:
– How is Blockchain different from a database?
– How is Amazon Managed Blockchain different than typical open source blockchain implementations?
– What are the use cases for Blockchain?

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Getting started with serverless

Getting started with serverless

This post is contributed by Maureen Lonergan, Director, AWS Training and Certification

We consistently hear from customers that they’re interested in building serverless applications to take advantage of the increased agility and decreased total cost of ownership (TCO) that serverless delivers. But we also know that serverless may be intimidating for those who are more accustomed to using instances or containers for compute.

Since we launched AWS Lambda in 2014, our serverless portfolio has expanded beyond event-driven computing. We now have serverless databases, integration, and orchestration tools. This enables you to build end-to-end serverless applications—but it also means that you must learn how to build using a new serverless operational model.

For this reason, AWS Training and Certification is pleased to offer a new course through Coursera entitled AWS Fundamentals: Building Serverless Applications.

This scenario-based course, developed by the experts at AWS, will:

  • Introduce the AWS serverless framework and architecture in the context of a real business problem.
  • Provide the foundational knowledge to become more proficient in choosing and creating serverless solutions using AWS.
  • Provide demonstrations of the AWS services needed for deploying serverless solutions.
  • Help you develop skills in building and deploying serverless solutions using real-world examples of a serverless website and chatbot.

The syllabus allocates more than nine hours of video content and reading material over four weekly lessons. Each lesson has an estimated 2–3 hours per week of study time (though you can set your own pace and deadlines), with suggested exercises in the AWS Management Console. There is an end-of-course assessment that covers all the learning objectives and content.

The course is on-demand and 100% digital; you can even audit it for free. A completion certificate and access to the graded assessments are available for $49.

What can you expect?

In this course you will learn to use the AWS Serverless portfolio to create a chatbot that answers the question, “Can I let my cat outside?” You will build an application using every one of the concepts and services discussed in the class, including:

At the end of the class, you can audibly interact with the application to ask that essential question, “Can my cat go out in Denver?” (See the conversation in the following screenshot.)

Serverless Coursera training app

Across the four weeks of the course, you learn:

  1. What serverless computing is and how to create a chatbot with Amazon Lex using an S3 bucket to host a web application.
  2. How to build a highly scalable API with API Gateway and use Amazon CloudFront as a content delivery network (CDN) for your site and API.
  3. How to use Lambda to build serverless functions that write data to DynamoDB.
  4. How to apply lessons from the previous weeks to extend and add functionality to the chatbot.

Serverless Coursera training

AWS Fundamentals: Building Serverless Applications is now available. This course complements other standalone digital courses by AWS Training and Certification. They include the highly recommended Introduction to Serverless Development, as well as the following:

from AWS Compute Blog

Customer Showcase: Extending Machine Learning to Industrial IoT Applications at the Edge

Customer Showcase: Extending Machine Learning to Industrial IoT Applications at the Edge

Customer Showcase: Extending Machine Learning to Industrial IoT Applications at the Edge
Industrial organizations are constantly looking for ways to modernize and transform their manufacturing processes and operations at scale. Edge computing, with the added ability to deploy machine learning models on connected assets at the manufacturing source, is enabling organizations to actualize the benefits of Industry 4.0. In this tech talk, we will discuss the dominant trends that intersect Industrial IoT (IIoT) applications and edge computing with an emphasis on how AWS IoT edge services combined with distributed machine learning frameworks can help analyze and act on manufacturing data to derive more meaningful insights. We will also feature a solution demonstration from our partner, STMicroelectronics, which showcases predictive maintenance and condition monitoring as one of several use case examples that harnesses the power of the cloud and machine learning at the edge.

Learning Objectives:
– Learn which Industrial IoT (IIoT) use cases and applications can benefit from edge computing paired with machine learning
– Become familiar with AWS IoT edge services and software, such as AWS IoT Greengrass and Amazon FreeRTOS
– See how AWS IoT edge services and partner solutions can be used to solve for real-world applications such as predictive maintenance and condition monitoring

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Simplify and Scale How You Connect Your Premises to AWS w/ AWS Direct Connect on AWS Transit Gateway

Simplify and Scale How You Connect Your Premises to AWS w/ AWS Direct Connect on AWS Transit Gateway

Simplify and Scale How You Connect Your Premises to AWS w/ AWS Direct Connect on AWS Transit Gateway
Simplify how you interconnect all of your Amazon Virtual Private Clouds across thousands of AWS accounts and into your on-premises networks through AWS Direct Connect connections. With the AWS Direct Connect support for AWS Transit Gateway, you can easily and quickly connect into a single centrally-managed gateway, rapidly growing the size of your network from your premises to the cloud. In this tech talk, you will learn how to use multi account Direct Connect gateway to interface your on-premises network with your AWS network through a AWS Transit Gateway.

Learning Objectives:
– Understand the key benefits of AWS Direct Connect and AWS Transit Gateway
– Learn about the architectural implications of AWS Direct Connect and AWS Transit Gateway
– Learn how to deploy AWS Direct Connect and AWS Transit Gateway yourself

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Getting Started with Cross-Account Encryption Using AWS KMS, Feat. Slack Enterprise Key Management

Getting Started with Cross-Account Encryption Using AWS KMS, Feat. Slack Enterprise Key Management

Getting Started with Cross-Account Encryption Using AWS KMS, Feat. Slack Enterprise Key Management
AWS Key Management Service (KMS) provides tools you can use to protect data and revoke access to keys when needed, even across accounts. Now, for the applications you build, you can give your customers more control over their data they store in your application by using KMS. In this tech talk, learn how KMS can be used by customers to administer third-party access to their data keys. You will learn how Slack Enterprise Key Management provides customers with complete control and visibility of access to their data in Slack.

Learning Objectives:
– Explore the features of AWS Key Management Service (KMS)
– Learn how to use AWS KMS to maintain cryptographic control over data even in third-party AWS accounts
– See how Slack uses AWS KMS in its Enterprise Key Management service

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Build Efficient and Accurate Recommendation Engines with Amazon Personalize – AWS Online Tech Talks

Build Efficient and Accurate Recommendation Engines with Amazon Personalize – AWS Online Tech Talks

Build Efficient and Accurate Recommendation Engines with Amazon Personalize – AWS Online Tech Talks
Recommendation engines make use cases like targeted marketing campaigns, discovering relationships between individuals and products for identifying trends and classifying users, re-ranking items, or delivering personalized notifications, and more, possible. Setting up and handling these engines with traditional methods is often a highly resource consuming task, hard to maintain, and can lead to inaccurate results leading to low impact in your business. In this tech talk, we will explore how by relying on services like Amazon Personalize, it is possible to create and manage recommendation engines efficiently, letting you focus on the real value of the data for your business. Furthermore, we will discover how the deep learning techniques available have a direct impact on the bottom line of your business, by increasing the accuracy leading to higher engagement and click through in your applications. We will briefly review how this works in context and dive into some demonstrations.

Learning Objectives:
– Explore the challenges faced when working with recommendation engines and how to address those efficiently
– Learn how Amazon Personalize allows you to create and manage powerful recommendation engines
– Learn what deep learning techniques are available for improving recommendation engines accuracy and its impact in the bottom line of your business

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