Amazon S3 Update – SigV2 Deprecation Period Extended & Modified

Amazon S3 Update – SigV2 Deprecation Period Extended & Modified

Every request that you make to the Amazon S3 API must be signed to ensure that it is authentic. In the early days of AWS we used a signing model that is known as Signature Version 2, or SigV2 for short. Back in 2012, we announced SigV4, a more flexible signing method, and made it the sole signing method for all regions launched after 2013. At that time, we recommended that you use it for all new S3 applications.

Last year we announced that we would be ending support for SigV2 later this month. While many customers have updated their applications (often with nothing more than a simple SDK update), to use SigV4, we have also received many requests for us to extend support.

New Date, New Plan
In response to the feedback on our original plan, we are making an important change. Here’s the summary:

Original Plan – Support for SigV2 ends on June 24, 2019.

Revised Plan – Any new buckets created after June 24, 2020 will not support SigV2 signed requests, although existing buckets will continue to support SigV2 while we work with customers to move off this older request signing method.

Even though you can continue to use SigV2 on existing buckets, and in the subset of AWS regions that support SigV2, I encourage you to migrate to SigV4, gaining some important security and efficiency benefits in the process. The newer signing method uses a separate, specialized signing key that is derived from the long-term AWS access key. The key is specific to the service, region, and date. This provides additional isolation between services and regions, and provides better protection against key reuse. Internally, our SigV4 implementation is able to securely cache the results of authentication checks; this reduces latency and adds to the overall resiliency of your application. To learn more, read Changes in Signature Version 4.

Identifying Use of SigV2
S3 has been around since 2006 and some of the code that you or your predecessors wrote way back then might still be around, dutifully making requests that are signed with SigV2. You can use CloudTrail Data Events or S3 Server Access Logs to find the old-school requests and target the applications for updates:

CloudTrail Data Events – Look for the SignatureVersion element within the additionalDataElement of each CloudTrail event entry (read Using AWS CloudTrail to Identify Amazon S3 Signature Version 2 Requests to learn more).

S3 Server Access Logs – Look for the SignatureVersion element in the logs (read Using Amazon S3 Access Logs to Identify Signature Version 2 Requests to learn more).

Updating to SigV4



“Do we need to change our code?”

The Europe (Frankfurt), US East (Ohio), Canada (Central), Europe (London), Asia Pacific (Seoul), Asia Pacific (Mumbai), Europe (Paris), China (Ningxia), Europe (Stockholm), Asia Pacific (Osaka Local), AWS GovCloud (US-East), and Asia Pacific (Hong Kong) Regions were launched after 2013, and support SigV4 but not SigV2. If you have code that accesses S3 buckets in that region, it is already making exclusive use of SigV4.

If you are using the latest version of the AWS SDKs, you are either ready or just about ready for the SigV4 requirement on new buckets beginning June 24, 2020. If you are using an older SDK, please check out the detailed version list at Moving from Signature Version 2 to Signature Version 4 for more information.

There are a few situations where you will need to make some changes to your code. For example, if you are using pre-signed URLs with the AWS Java, JavaScript (node.js), or Python SDK, you need to set the correct region and signature version in the client configuration. Also, be aware that SigV4 pre-signed URLs are valid for a maximum of 7 days, while SigV2 pre-signed URLs can be created with a maximum expiry time that could be many weeks or years in the future (in almost all cases, using time-limited URLs is a much better practice). Using SigV4 will improve your security profile, but might also mandate a change in the way that you create, store, and use the pre-signed URLs. While using long-lived pre-signed URLs was easy and convenient for developers, using SigV4 with URLs that have a finite expiration is a much better security practice.

If you are using Amazon EMR, you should upgrade your clusters to version 5.22.0 or later so that all requests to S3 are made using SigV4 (see Amazon EMR 5.x Release Versions for more info).

If your S3 objects are fronted by Amazon CloudFront and you are signing your own requests, be sure to update your code to use SigV4. If you are using Origin Access Identities to restrict access to S3, be sure to include the x-amz-content-sha256 header and the proper regional S3 domain endpoint.

We’re Here to Help
The AWS team wants to help make your transition to SigV4 as smooth and painless as possible. If you run in to problems, I strongly encourage you to make use of AWS Support, as described in Getting Started with AWS Support.

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Jeff;

 

from AWS News Blog https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-s3-update-sigv2-deprecation-period-extended-modified/

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